Changing the Future of All Minds

WAM Awards $500,000 in Gender-Based Research Grants

The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement announces today that it has awarded $500,000 in gender-based research grants to researchers at six major institutions across the country. The six grants were made possible in large part to the funds raised during 2017’s Move For Minds Event, the organization’s nationwide crowdfunding and awareness-building event held in June in partnership with Equinox Sports Clubs.

The grants will fund cutting-edge studies that will get us closer to answering the complicated question at the heart of The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement: Why is it that two thirds of people with Alzheimer’s are women?

The 2017 grantees are:

  • ROBERTA BRINTON, CENTER FOR INNOVATION IN BRAIN SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 
  • WOMEN’S ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH INITIATIVE, ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION 
  • ANN ROMNEY CENTER FOR NEUROLOGIC DISEASES AT BRIGHAM AND WOMEN’S HOSPITAL AND HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL 
  • LOU RUVO CENTER FOR BRAIN HEALTH, CLEVELAND CLINIC 
  • ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & MEMORY DISORDERS PROGRAM, WEILL CORNELL 
  • UCI-MIND INSTITUTE FOR MEMORY IMPAIRMENTS AND NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

All six of WAM’s grantees recognize the urgent need to understand how gender differences in brain structure, hormonal physiology, genetics, disease progression, and behavior may contribute to the disproportionate incidence and rates of Alzheimer’s and cognitive decline in women. WAM and its grantees believe that by focusing research on the largest group effected by the disease, we will unlock the mysteries surrounding the disease and get closer to a treatment, prevention or cure for all. The ultimate goal of WAM is to change the future for all minds and funding women-focused research is a critical step to achieving that goal.

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